laamee:

This statue in Spain shocked me and my dad…. Then we found out it’s a fish

laamee:

This statue in Spain shocked me and my dad…. Then we found out it’s a fish

thecanadianconsultant:

youkilledmyfatherpreparetopie:

jcatgrl:

bl00d-sugar:

I FOUND A TUTORIAL ON HOW TO MAKE DILDO POPSICLES IM LEGITIMATELy DYING OF LAUGHTER RN

imagine eating one of those in public. you make eye contact with someone. lick it a couple more times. swirl your tongue around. AND THEN YOU BITE IT IN HALF.

tumblr is such an interesting place to look at in public

"Look, Ma!! Peen pops!"

(Source: saramortis)

fatchance:

Stinkhorn mushroom (Phallus rubicundus), in Portsmouth, Virginia. In this species, spores are borne in the icky slime that covers the cap. 
This is a fairly cosmopolitan stinkhorn, whose occurrence in eastern North America has probably been encouraged by gardeners. I found about 100 of these at the elementary school near my home, growing in city-supplied mulch spread under a stand of crepe myrtles. I suppose the school division’s groundskeepers are busy propagating stinkhorns at schools all over town.
Please click photo for enlarged view.  

fatchance:

Stinkhorn mushroom (Phallus rubicundus), in Portsmouth, Virginia. In this species, spores are borne in the icky slime that covers the cap. 

This is a fairly cosmopolitan stinkhorn, whose occurrence in eastern North America has probably been encouraged by gardeners. I found about 100 of these at the elementary school near my home, growing in city-supplied mulch spread under a stand of crepe myrtles. I suppose the school division’s groundskeepers are busy propagating stinkhorns at schools all over town.

Please click photo for enlarged view.  

tzaddi53:

Phallus hadriani

Stinkhorn

nosebear:

Stinkhorn, (Phallus impudicus)
Found outside Durham, North East England, November, 2012

nosebear:

Stinkhorn, (Phallus impudicus)

Found outside Durham, North East England, November, 2012

fungipunk:

The stinkhorn (Phallus impudicus) is a very common fungi found throughout British woodlands during the summer months. They first appear upon the woodland floor in the form of ‘eggs’, which are similar to puffballs in size and shape. At this stage of their development, the eggs are known as Witch’s or Devil’s eggs. Despite these names of ill forebode, the white flesh found within the egg is edible and can be eaten raw, it has a creamy nutty flavour which I found very pleasant. Care should be taken not to confuse it with Amanita species which look similar at this stage and could prove deadly.
Once the egg hatches it quickly becomes apparent that the fungi is aptly named, Phallus impudicus means shameless penis! The sight of the stinkhorn, was apparently, too much for many a Victorian mistress. Etty, the eldest daughter of Charles Darwin, is said to have collected and burnt any specimens she found in her garden, to prevent them from corrupting her servants.
As an evolutionary solution to the problem of spore dispersal, few fungi can outdo the stinkhorn. The sticky spore bearing mass at the tip of the fungi (the gleba) has an incredibly powerful smell of rotting flesh. This smell attracts flies which consume the gleba with great gusto until all that remains is the white honeycombed tip. Spores are then deposited throughout the woodland in the dung of the flies, genius.
So next time you are walking around your local woodland and the repugnant smell of rotting meat fills your nostrils, have a look around, it could be Satan’s Member

gallimenagerie:

Elegant Stinkhorn
…I didn’t think these smelled nearly as terrible as other witnesses say. But I’m still laughing at the shape and you can’t stop me.

gallimenagerie:

Elegant Stinkhorn

…I didn’t think these smelled nearly as terrible as other witnesses say. But I’m still laughing at the shape and you can’t stop me.